Plantoil/diesel conversion basics
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danalinscott

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(Under construction)

A useful discussion with diagrams
http://biodiesel.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/159605551/m/6781080122







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steph09872002

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Reply with quote  #2 
  It would be great if someone could give me step by step instructions-in laymans terms- going from the 3/8 coolant lines from the hot rod to wherever it is that the 3/8 connects with the 5/8.  It is a hih that runs from the tank to under the hood then to a vw engine oil cooler etc....I will also post this in the other forum that you spoke of.
Thanks again
stephanie
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Reply with quote  #3 
I don't understand that.  I don't have a FPHE my hotrod goes straight to the hih,  if you could just post what i need to do to get from the 3/8 hotrod to the 5/8 coolant hih.  For example--you will need to go from the hih with a 5/8" tee to a 5/8" to 3/8" hose barb to a 3/8" hose.  Could I just do that or is it more complex than that?
Stephanie

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Okay there was a response that said that I could just use  3/4 x1/2 x 3/4 pex tees.  Is it really that simple.  Do I just take the coolant return line (back at the tank) and loop that to the hih tee then splice in the pex tees back there?  That sounds good to me..any feedback.  Thanks again for all of your help
stephanie

danalinscott

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Quote:
Okay there was a response that said that I could just use  3/4 x1/2 x 3/4 pex tees.  Is it really that simple.  Do I just take the coolant return line (back at the tank) and loop that to the hih tee then splice in the pex tees back there? 


Maybe..but there is currently no way to tell.

This would be a LOT easier if you would post either a schematic or a detailed description of your conversion configuration. Providing answers without that is like trying to answer a question that has only been half asked.
Without that I have to proceed with basic questions about your system.

Like:

Do you have two 5/8" coolant lines to the back of your vehicle? If so is one or both of them a HIH?  Can you describe how the ends are made? (eg what fittings you used to pass the smaller fuel line from the end of the larger coolant hose).

What is the size and material of the inner hose/pipe of the HIH? 5/16" copper? Aluminum? Nylon? Pex?

Without that type of info there is just no way I can provide accurate info on how to tie into the HIH from the HotRod.

BTW..the VW oil cooler can be several things. I assumed it was the small FPHE that a crankcase oil filter screws onto.
Can you clarify?




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steph09872002

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Reply with quote  #6 
Do you have two 5/8" coolant lines to the back of your vehicle? If so is one or both of them a HIH?  Can you describe how the ends are made? (eg what fittings you used to pass the smaller fuel line from the end of the larger coolant hose).

What is the size and material of the inner hose/pipe of the HIH? 5/16" copper? Aluminum? Nylon? Pex?

Without that type of info there is just no way I can provide accurate info on how to tie into the HIH from the HotRod.

BTW..the VW oil cooler can be several things. I assumed it was the small FPHE that a crankcase oil filter screws onto.
Can you clarify?

Yes there are 2 5/8 coolant lines in the back and one is a hih--5/8" coolant hose with 3/8" copper tube running through the coolant hose is then cut a couple of inches before the end with a copper tee inserted.  The fuel line continues to run through a hose barb and compression fitting.  Similar to the fryer to fuel tank style.

The vw oil cooler is the oil filter housing out of a vw that has a square box underneath the housing which coolant runs through.  Does that clarify?
Hopefully this is more helpful.. I would post a schematic but I don't know how to make a computer generated one and post it.
steph09872002

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Reply with quote  #7 
Yes there are 2 5/8 coolant lines in the back and one is a hih--5/8" coolant hose with 3/8" copper tube running through the coolant hose is then cut a couple of inches before the end with a copper tee inserted.  The fuel line continues to run through a hose barb and compression fitting.  Similar to the fryer to fuel tank style.
The vw oil cooler is the oil filter housing out of a vw that has a square box underneath the housing which coolant runs through.  Does that clarify?
Hopefully this is more helpful.. I would post a schematic but I don't know how to make a computer generated one and post it.
danalinscott

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Quote:
The vw oil cooler is the oil filter housing out of a vw that has a square box underneath the housing which coolant runs through.  Does that clarify?

Yes....it is a small FPHE. Make sure that you don;t use a bypass type oil filter with it.

Quote:
Yes there are 2 5/8 coolant lines in the back and one is a hih--5/8" coolant hose with 3/8" copper tube running through the coolant hose is then cut a couple of inches before the end with a copper tee inserted.  The fuel line continues to run through a hose barb and compression fitting.  


That helps.
You may be able to just use a bushing to adapt the existing copper tees to fit the same 3/8" od copper pipe that is used in the HotRod. Then run 3/8"id fuel line for the coolant from the modified tees to the HotRod.

I suggest that you add a temp monitor of some kind to make sure that your VO is reaching temps of at least 140°F prior to the IP since you are using such a small FPHE.

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ProjectPurity

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Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Yes....it is a small FPHE. Make sure that you don;t use a bypass type oil filter with it.


Are you saying not to use like an Amsoil bypass kit on VWs that use that oil heat exchanger?  or just don't put a 1/10th micron bypass filter on that spot without doing the proper relocation and typical bypass kit installation.

danalinscott

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectPurity
Quote:
Yes....it is a small FPHE. Make sure that you don;t use a bypass type oil filter with it.


Are you saying not to use like an Amsoil bypass kit on VWs that use that oil heat exchanger?  or just don't put a 1/10th micron bypass filter on that spot without doing the proper relocation and typical bypass kit installation.


When used in a VO fuel circuit (instead of the lubrication oil circuit)  a bypass type (oil) filter must not be used since they are designed to allow unfiltered oil to pass if the element becomes clogged. This is desirable when used in a lubrication application..but very undesirable in a fuel filtration circuit.

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ProjectPurity

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Reply with quote  #11 
I understand.  A friend of mine who has worked many years as a tool and die maker are working on adapting this HE to work with the stock VW fuel filter.  It seems that a plate will need to be made up at the lower end of the HE so that it will properly bolt up to the filter.

For a different issue, in your example of dual parallel coolant circuits, is it possible to put a cross (4 outlets instead of three as with a tee) into the coolant lines and run two parallel circuits that way?  If so or if not, why?

danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #12 
Quote:
in your example of dual parallel coolant circuits, is it possible to put a cross (4 outlets instead of three as with a tee) into the coolant lines and run two parallel circuits that way?  If so or if not, why?


It should be possible to do that. But remember that for everything to work correctly all of the individual circuits must be "balanced" for flow.

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ProjectPurity

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Reply with quote  #13 
When you say "balanced for flow", do you mean each parallel loop needs to flow the same GPH regardless of the heat transfer of that circuit?  So, if i were to know my coolant temp before the parallel loops, am I to balance the return TEMP or FLOW RATE at the end of the loop?

Balancing flow rate would be as easy as installing a ball valve on the loop with the highest flow rate.  Balancing the temps would require a bit different approach.

Please let me know

danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #14 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectPurity
When you say "balanced for flow", do you mean each parallel loop needs to flow the same GPH regardless of the heat transfer of that circuit?  So, if i were to know my coolant temp before the parallel loops, am I to balance the return TEMP or FLOW RATE at the end of the loop?

Balancing flow rate would be as easy as installing a ball valve on the loop with the highest flow rate.  Balancing the temps would require a bit different approach.

Please let me know

To clarify.
I am referring to balancing flow to each coolant circuit has enough coolant flowing through it to provide more than enough heat to the components in each loop. This is done by using inexpensive indoor/outdoor thermometers with remote sensors.  Like these the ones described HERE.

The sensor is placed on the return line after the last component in the circuit and the temps on each noted while driving at normal speeds. The flow control valve (which as you noted CAN be a large dia ball valve in the highest flow circuit) is then adjusted and the procedure repeated until the temps are correct. Usually this does not mean they are equal..since the temp of coolant returning from heated fuel pickups can be much lower than the temp of final coolant/fuel heat exchangers. 

Thanks for asking..I've been doing this so long I often forget to explain thoroughly. 


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