Plantoil/diesel conversion basics
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danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #1 

Injector line heaters are a relatively new concept in heating Vegoil
(VO) for better combustion and slight increase in fuel economy and power.

The main goal of most of the components in a VO conversion is to raise
the temperature of the VO prior to injection in the combustion chamber
in order to lower the viscosity of the VO to as close as possibly
equal the viscosity of diesel fuel. Depending on the variety of oil
this occurs at a temperature range of 200°F to 320°F.

Injector line heaters specifically heat the fuel supply lines that run from the IP  to each injector in traditional diesel engines. Recent newer diesel
engine designs have eliminated injector lines to various degrees so
injector line heaters may be of limited usefulness in these. But in
diesel engines with exposed injector lines there exists the
opportunity to add heat to the VO in a range not possible with heat
sources located in the fuel flow prior to the Injector Pump (IP).

The first commercially available injector line heaters were simply  Ni-Chrome wires covered with a fiberglass insulative tube and secured to the injector
lines with high temp aluminum or silicone tapes.

More sophisticated and efficient line heaters are currently being fitted to large truck fleets which have converted to VO. These are available in limited quantities to the public as well. These are engineered to be installed immediately next to the injectors for maximum efficiency and have a high temp adhesive to ensure the best possible heat exchange to the fuel in the injector lines. They also have a insulative and reflective covering on their exterior which helps direct heat to the injector lines and limit heat loss to the surrounding air. A layer of high temp silicone tape acts as additional insulation and on the most sophisticated installations PTFE or silicone high temp insulative sheaths are installed over the injector line heaters as well.
 
Both designs work on the same principal of transferring the heat
generated by electrical resistance to the metal fuel supply lines via
conduction. This heat is then transferred to the VO fuel passing
through the injector lines on its' way to the injectors.

The basic wiring harness for hooking up ILHs looks like:

You can purchase a ready made ILH wiring harness HERE.

For a link to injector line heater manufacturers go HERE.


A forum with some discussion on injector line heaters is at:
 
The injector line heaters I use exclusively are available from:
http://lineheaterspecialists.netfirms.com/

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nightdrive

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Reply with quote  #2 
Are there any long term problems with hooking the heaters to the ignition key and heating the diesel? I have read that hot diesel looses its lubrication and will damage  an IP over time, but what about the cylinders?

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danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #3 
Quote:
Are there any long term problems with hooking the heaters to the ignition key and heating the diesel? I have read that hot diesel looses its lubrication and will damage  an IP over time, but what about the cylinders?


I don't think that heating diesel fuel after it has passed the IP will create lubricity problems. But I also don't think that you want to hook the line heaters directly to the ignition. Most manual switches are not rated for the current that line heaters will draw. This means that a relay has to be activated by any switch you use. I suggest hooking in a switch to the relay circuit and hooking THAT to a wire that is only hot when the ignition is turned on . The wiring harnesses I use for hooking up ILHs have a switch that lights up when the line heaters are turned on.

If you want more info on these wiring harnesses it is HERE.

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Swany

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Reply with quote  #4 
Dana, 

On your ILH wiring harness, there is another lead coming off the relay that is unused.  Is that another send, and is it "on" when the lead powering the ilh's is on?

The reason I ask is that i'm thinking of powering my fuel selector solenoid off it to eliminate 1 dash switch.  I also like the idea of turning off the ilh's simultaneously to switching back to petro diesel.

Thanks,

dave swanson



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Swany

99 Jetta TDI, Linscott hotrod, hoh, fphe, jacketed filter, inline heaters. Coolant plumbed in series with parallel loops for fphe and rest of rig.
danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #5 

Quote:

On your ILH wiring harness, there is another lead coming off the relay that is unused.  Is that another send, and is it "on" when the lead powering the ilh's is on?

 


Actually the unused lead is on when the other lead is off.

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lawrencerhodes

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Reply with quote  #6 

I have used a Vormax and a vegtherm on a 240D for 7 years and 100 k miles.  I think if I could get a higher heat temp and have it closer to the injectors this would be an advantage over the vegtherm.  I have measured temps up to about 225F on the plate of the vegtherm. I have read the lineheaters are hotter. When starting with the lineheaters is sitting before ignition needed to heat them up?  Will the vegtherm still be needed?  I want to eliminate the vegtherm if possible.  The only better option I can see is specially designed injector lines designed like little vegtherms.  Lawrence Rhodes..

jamesgibeson

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Reply with quote  #7 
If my FPHE is providing 190 degrees F and I add these injection line heaters will the veggie oil be too hot? 

Should I try to add a temp gauge to my injector lines or does it really matter? 

During the winter my FPHE only puts out about 140 degrees F. What will the temp of my oil be with injector line heaters in this situation?

BTW I just ordered the wiring harness and injector line heaters! Can't wait to get them!!


danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #8 
Odds are that when your coolant reads 190F (on the dash gauge) the VO coming from the FPHE heated by that coolant is 20-30 degrees cooler than that. But even if it IS 190F exiting the FPHE by the time it makes it through the IP and into the injector lines it is under 150F. 

Regardless..there is little that wvo upt to 250F can damage once the wvo has made it to the injector lines. Too hot wvo due to Injector Line Heaters should not be a problem. I don't recommend dding a temp gauge to your injector lines since it may add to the probability that a line may develop racks. If you want to get an idea of how hot your VO is at the injector add an insulated temp sensor as close as possible to the injector "spill/return" line connection. This line gathers the fuel not used by the injectors and returns it to the fuel tank (or IP with a looped return) and should provide a good approximation of that temp (minus 10-30 degrees).

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jamesgibeson

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Reply with quote  #9 
Do you think an infrared temperature gun would work well for checking the temperature? It might be nice to get one, so I can check the temps. of other things too like my gas tank and Pollak valves.

I've only used one briefly. Are they accurate enough to take a reading from a small return line just after an injector?
danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #10 
IR temperature guns are difficult to get ACCURATE readings from but will usually provide a "ballpark" idea of the tempurature of what you are aiming them at. To get an accurrate reading the optimum target surface must be flat and black.
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ytk

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Reply with quote  #11 
I Noticed that in another forum you recommended of not using them(injector heaters). Has it changed?


Thanks
YTK
 
jamesgibeson

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Reply with quote  #12 
YTK,

I have been using them and they seem to be working just fine. I think one might be coming off, so i need to clean it and put some more silicone tape around it.

So far so good.

-james
danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #13 
"I Noticed that in another forum you recommended of not using

them(injector heaters). Has it 

changed?"

Many years ago when injector line heaters were still in the experimental

stage there were 

several versions of injector line heaters available. Several were very

poorly designed and didn't really do the job well. One by one they

stopped being made. Today I believe there are only two injector line

heaters being offered. One is a very poorly designed model made with

stainless steel welding wire. The other is made by Line Heater Specialists

and is approximately 4 times more effective. In the spirit of full disclosure

I am in the process of buying the company that makes them. 

I reccommend using injector line heaters on every conversion if possible.

They are the only means of raising VO fuel to the 
pre injection 

temperature 

recommended  by the ACREVO study .

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ytk

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Reply with quote  #14 
Sounds promising .  Also i think some of the guys in that other forum thread mentioned that the heaters might cause some kind of defect to the injector lines? Is that not an issue anymore? 
In my conversion  i have a solenoid valve and an additional lift pump  which are connected to a relay and a switch and draw a maximum of 7.5 amps. Do you think it will be safe on the alternator and battery to add 4 heaters ? On the same relay and same switch? 

Thanks!

YTK
danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #15 
No injector line issues with the ILHs I use. 
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