Plantoil/diesel conversion basics
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danalinscott

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Originally posted by Dieselrover:
On the OM603 engine, as the 4 and 5 cylinder Mercedes, you want to tap into the heater hose where it emerges from the head - so between the head and where the heaterhose enters the firewall/bulkhead. It's easier on your 6 cylinder OM603 engine since that hose start behind the oil filter housing - on the 5 cylinder OM617 engine you need to take care exaxtly where you place your T or you'll hate yourself every time you (try to) change the filter.



So, you install a 5/8 X 5/8 X 3/8 T into that hose, and that's your coolant supply. For your return T, you need to install it *after* the little 12V circulation pump and before the waterpump. If you install it before the 12V pump, you'll only get circulation when the heater is on. Usually this hose is 5/8" ID also, but sometimes it's 3/4" - so check.


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danalinscott

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rvahey
jwanted to say hello and thanks in advance -
I was just wondering what I can use to route the coolant in a mercedes 240 to a FPHE and a tank heater. What is the best place to come out of the coolant line and what is the best "splitter" for the job - suggested line size?
- Thanks

The best place to tap into coolant heat in nearly all vehicles is the coolant hoses that run from the engine to the cabin heater. On most vehicels these run nearly side by side from the engine to the passenger side firewall but on  MBs one of these emerges from the firewall on the drivers side near the oil filter.  One can usually determine which of these coolant hoses is the "to" (the cab heater)and which is the "from" by starting the engine cold and then holding onto them as the engine warms.

Metal or nylon "tees' are then used to create a secondary coolant circuit that provides heat to the coolant heated VO conversion components. Often a second coolant circuit is then tee'd off of that circuit so components with low coolant flow capability do not limit that of the those with high coolant flow requirements. Some examples of coolant circuits used in VO conversions are available at: http://www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/post/voconversionbasics/vpost?id=2273794

As for what size tees you will need for this (and probably a valve to "balance" the coolant flow (and purge air bubbles)) you will probably have to determine this yourself by measuring the outside diameter (od) and deducting around 1/4" to find the od of the tees you need. Do not rely on what the package or bin tag indicates the size is..actually measure the tees od to get the proper size. 

Coolant heater hose is usually used to route coolant from the tees to the FPHEs ports. Try to get hose barb adapters that closely match the interior diameter (id) of the hose that fits the tees. If you can't exactly match this opting for a slightly larger size (up to 1/16") will allow you to force the hose on to the larger hose barb by using a bit of VO as a lubricant on the hose barb and inside the hose end. A slightly smaller hose barb (up to 1/16") can usually be clamped tightly enough not to leak with a high quality hose clamp (not the hardware variety) so you have a bit of latitude there.

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