Plantoil/diesel conversion basics
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danalinscott

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Old post 7/12/06 at 01:29 PM  Email PM Reply

Quote:
Originally Posted by CumminsDiesel
When I convert to SVO, I know I'll need a custom tank.  I have a short bed truck with a tool box and will want to have a tank built that will straddle the wheel well. 

As far as tank material goes, is there anything wrong with aluminum?  Can carbon steel be used or if it's steel, should it be stainlelss?


Aluminum works fine. But is costly to have fabricated.
So is stainless steel.
I use mild steel and have for years.
I have never had a problem with steel tanks.

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Docfxit

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Can you think of any drawbacks to using a large tank?

I have an '07 GMC 2500 with a 26 gal diesel tank. I'm thinking of replacing the 26 gal tank with an under bed 48 gal tank and using it for WVO. I'm thinking of installing an 11 gal tank in the bed for diesel (start and stop). I won't be keeping the 48 gal tank full all the time for normal driving. I'm thinking it would be nice to have a larger tank when I go on trips. I'm thinking of using a HotFox for the pickup so the entire tank doesn't have to be heated.

The reason I thought it would be a good idea to have a large tank for VO is
when I go on a trip I would like to have enough VO for the entire trip without
taking the time to collect and process more VO on the road. I am in Southern
Calif. I don't know what kind of millage I will get towing my boat. San
Francisco is about 315 miles one way. Lake Mead is about 283 miles one way.
When I am driving around town I won't need to fill it more than half way
because I don't want to carry the weight.  When I'm on a trip it will be nice not to fill up the bed of the truck with extra VO.

What are the drawbacks to using a large tank?

Thank you,

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danalinscott

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Quote:
Can you think of any drawbacks to using a large tank?
I have an '07 GMC 2500 with a 26 gal diesel tank. I'm thinking of replacing the 26 gal tank with an under bed 48 gal tank and using it for WVO. I'm thinking of installing an 11 gal tank in the bed for diesel (start and stop). I won't be keeping the 48 gal tank full all the time for normal driving. I'm thinking it would be nice to have a larger tank when I go on trips. I'm thinking of using a HotFox for the pickup so the entire tank doesn't have to be heated.


Even a well baffled large tank tends to promote more VO fuel polymerization than a smaller tank. In fact I have only seen signs of polymerization in large tanks. There tends to be much more exposed surface area on which VO can be splashed in a large tank and it is this splashed VO fuel which tends to polymerize quickly since it is exposed to so much O2. 

Also, large tanks tend to be kept partially full. This promotes sloshing and more O2 exposure of the VO fuel ...and so promotes polymerization.  Better to use a tank sized for your most common use that is emptied once a week. And why haul the extra weight around when you don't need to?

For long trips add an extra poly tank or two to allow you to bring along extra VO fuel. Or collect clean VO cubees and haul extra VO fuel in them. Leave the cardboard covering on them and fabricate a spout so they can easily and neatly be poured into your main tank.

If you do use a Hotfox (which is designed for use with diesel fuel in cold climates) install it horizontally near the bottom of the tank. Installing it vertically is much less efficient when they are used for VO fuel. 





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Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott

Even a well baffled large tank tends to promote more VO fuel polymerization than a smaller tank. In fact I have only seen signs of polymerization in large tanks. There tends to be much more exposed surface area on which VO can be splashed in a large tank and it is this splashed VO fuel which tends to polymerize quickly since it is exposed to so much O2. 


Does anyone know where I could buy an endoscope to see inside of a tank.  I'd like to see what it looks like.

Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott

Also, large tanks tend to be kept partially full. This promotes sloshing and more O2 exposure of the VO fuel ...and so promotes polymerization. 


Does a poly tank solve the polymerization problem?

Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott
Better to use a tank sized for your most common use that is emptied once a week. And why haul the extra weight around when you don't need to?


As I said I wasn't planning on keeping it full just for this reason.

Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott


For long trips add an extra poly tank or two to allow you to bring along extra VO fuel.


Do you know of a good source for poly tanks?

Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott
Or collect clean VO cubees and haul extra VO fuel in them. Leave the cardboard covering on them and fabricate a spout so they can easily and neatly be poured into your main tank.


Any suggestions/pictures on creating a spout?

Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott

If you do use a Hotfox (which is designed for use with diesel fuel in cold climates) install it horizontally near the bottom of the tank. Installing it vertically is much less efficient when they are used for VO fuel.


That sounds like a great idea.  I'm guessing most people mount it vertically because it would have less of a tendency to leak.  Any ideas on how to install it in a poly tank to assure less leaks?  I would think when it's installed horizontally if the end of the Hotfox isn't supported by the bottom of the tank the bouncing of the truck would tend to put strain on the threads.

Thank you for all your input,

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danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:

Originally Posted by danalinscott

Also, large tanks tend to be kept partially full. This promotes sloshing and more O2 exposure of the VO fuel ...and so promotes polymerization. 
Does a poly tank solve the polymerization problem?


No. But it is only a problem with large tanks...esp. if they are kept half full.

Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott
Better to use a tank sized for your most common use that is emptied once a week. And why haul the extra weight around when you don't need to?


As I said I wasn't planning on keeping it full just for this reason.
 
 
Keeping it half full does not solve the problem. Half full tanks have more available oxygen, present more tank wall where polymerization can occur most rapidly, and tend to slosh VO onto the tank walls more.
 
Quote:
 Do you know of a good source for poly tanks?
 
 
Quote:
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott

If you do use a Hotfox (which is designed for use with diesel fuel in cold climates) install it horizontally near the bottom of the tank. Installing it vertically is much less efficient when they are used for VO fuel.


That sounds like a great idea.  I'm guessing most people mount it vertically because it would have less of a tendency to leak.  Any ideas on how to install it in a poly tank to assure less leaks?  I would think when it's installed horizontally if the end of the Hotfox isn't supported by the bottom of the tank the bouncing of the truck would tend to put strain on the threads.
 
Yes...it needs to be supported. I do not use HotFoxes since I have a much better less expensive unit available. It screws into a 1"NPT port. These can usually be spin welded into a poly tank..or if there is sufficient access a bulkhead fitting can be installed in the tank.

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by danalinscott


Yes...it needs to be supported. I do not use HotFoxes since I have a much better less expensive unit available. It screws into a 1"NPT port. These can usually be spin welded into a poly tank..or if there is sufficient access a bulkhead fitting can be installed in the tank.


What size bulkhead fitting is needed?

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danalinscott

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Quote:
What size bulkhead fitting is needed?


Can you be a bit more specific on that question?


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oldmanc

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Reply with quote  #8 
Hi Dana:

Your 5/30/06 post saying you use a better and less expensive tank heater than the hot fox; what type do you use, and do you always mount it horizontally?  How do you support it? 

Thanks! 
danalinscott

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Reply with quote  #9 
I use a Hot Rod. I always mount it horizontally since in cold temps or with high fat/hydrogenated wvo a vertically mounted probe type heated pickup will liquefy a "tube" of wvo directly in contact with it and when that is drawn out at switchover air will be sucked into the pickup.

Lengths of up to 4' do not appear to need support in steel tanks. In plastic tanks they are simply supported with a 2" long foam sleeve.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldmanc
Hi Dana:

Your 5/30/06 post saying you use a better and less expensive tank heater than the hot fox; what type do you use, and do you always mount it horizontally?  How do you support it? 

Thanks! 




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karufta

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Reply with quote  #10 

Is the 2" long foam sleeve for hot rod support you refer to the same type foam sleeve used in your HOH plans? So its ok to have that submerged in oil all the time?

danalinscott

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Yes and yes.


Quote:
Originally Posted by karufta

Is the 2" long foam sleeve for hot rod support you refer to the same type foam sleeve used in your HOH plans? So its ok to have that submerged in oil all the time?


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Dana danalinscott@yahoo.com
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Reply with quote  #12 
i see a bunch of different types of tanks, what about using a fuel tank that i pick up from a old car that someone is parting out. that should work fine, right?
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